Advances in Agriculture
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Acceptance rate13%
Submission to final decision92 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore1.600
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Improvement of Soybean Crop for Yield, Stress Tolerance, and Value-Added Products Using a Transgenic Approach

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 Journal profile

Advances in Agriculture publishes research on the cultivation of soil and crops, and the rearing of livestock. Its focus is on new methods and technologies for improving agricultural processes, increasing yield, conservation and breeding.

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Advances in Agriculture maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Review Article

Contribution of Climate-Smart Forage and Fodder Production for Sustainable Livestock Production and Environment: Lessons and Challenges from Ethiopia

Sustainable farm animal raising is dependent on the production of sufficient quantities and quality of forages and fodder, especially in dry regions. Improved forage and feed species are an option for these aspects because adequate feed resources enhance soil health and carbon, generate income, and reduce emissions. Therefore, the purpose of this review paper was to investigate the role of climate-smart forage production in sustaining farm animal production and maintaining the environment in arid and semiarid regions. Seasonal fluctuations in feed supply cause temporal scarcity in Ethiopia, with more acute gaps in dry periods, particularly in drought-prone regions. To address these problems in the country, improve forages to strengthen farm productivity, climate change resilience, and environmental sustainability, particularly in arid and semiarid areas. The country has a long history and is of some exemplary practices in indigenous improved forage production, but the input of improved forage to the total biomass production in feed resources is still low due to many factors like scarcity of land and water for irrigation, lack of awareness, forage seed, and policy recommendations. Despite the potential profits of feed and forage grasses and legumes, the availability of species adapted to a wide range of situations in actual use in the livestock sector has been insufficient. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that climate-resilient forage species be popularized to sustain livestock production and the environment, particularly in the country’s arid and semiarid regions.

Research Article

Agromorphological Characterization of Maize Hybrids and Estimation of Genetic Parameters in Mid-Hills of Far-West Nepal

The experiment was laid out in alpha-lattice design with two replicates of each genotype which comprised twenty-three heat-tolerant maize hybrids received from CIMMYT-Mexico and three check varieties. These treatment genotypes were evaluated at the Agronomy farm, Gokuleshwor College, Baitadi, Nepal, during the spring season of 2021. ZH191065 and ZH191158 were found to be the tallest (307.2 cm) and the shortest (227.6 cm) genotypes, respectively. High heritability (>60%) with high genetic advances in most traits, ensures the predominance difference of the genetic components observed among accessions. The presence of differences among genotypes showed that selection is possible by evaluating the days of 50% anthesis, days of 50% silking, anthesis-silking interval, number of ears per plant, number of grains per row, number of rows per cob, cob length, cob diameter, and grain yield; most of these evaluated morphological traits were found highly correlated with grain yield of varieties, suggesting that indirect selection achieves improvement for high yield. Based on yield ranks, ZH 19782, ZH 19961, and DKC 9108 could be promoted as potential higher-yielding heat-tolerant maize hybrids for Nepal.

Research Article

Challenges of Computer Vision Adoption in the Kenyan Agricultural Sector and How to Solve Them: A General Perspective

This study addresses the underlying challenges of computer vision adoption in the Kenyan agricultural sector and how to solve these hurdles to commercialize this technology. Technological advancements have revolutionized the agriculture sector, where artificial intelligence enhances yields, mitigates losses, and manages natural resources, leading to increased productivity. Kenya is still lagging in the commercialization of computer vision to improve its agricultural sector, which is the largest source of GDP. Kenya has remarkable skills and expertise in artificial intelligence that can support artificial intelligence implementation; the government policies, data availability, and high cost incurred in starting a computer vision company are problematic. Through better government policies on subsidies and data, research and development investments, and AI forums, Kenya will solve the challenges of adopting computer vision. While computer vision has the potential to revolutionize the agricultural industry by improving crop yield, detecting diseases, and increasing efficiency, there are several barriers to its adoption, including inadequate infrastructure, lack of technical expertise, and limited funding. This study aims to identify the challenges hindering the implementation of computer vision technology in the Kenyan agricultural sector and propose potential solutions to address these challenges.

Research Article

Tomato Production under Synergistic Application of Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria and Phosphate Amendments

Phosphate solubilizing bacteria have multi-dimensional benefits in broad host range interaction, accessing nutrients, phytohormone induction, stress alleviation, biocontrol activity, and eco-friend approach. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PSB isolates coinoculated with compost, bone meal, and DAP fertilizer on tomato growth response. Tomato seeds were treated with 10 selected PSB isolates separately and grown for 20 days on seedbed, then transplanted to field that was treated with external P-sources and enriched by PSB inoculum. PSB isolates showed positive interaction and achieved significant plant assays including plant height, leaves, branches, flowers, and fruit development. Isolate K-10-41 significantly promoted tomato plant height, floral development, and fruit yield, Mk-20-7 enhanced height and fruit weight whereas K-10-27 induced tomato fruit numbers. Compost application promoted tomato-PSB interaction and induced tomato vegetative growth whereas bone meal was least promotor for most of tomato plant assays. Bone meal was however, one of the top fruit development inducers (harvested 20.94 fruits/plant weighing 881.97 gm). Mixing 50% of recommended compost and DAP fertilizer application enhanced tomato vegetative growth and fruit yield (21 fruits/plant harvested that weighed 872.46 gm). Based on the overwhelming performance, K-10-41 and Mk-20-7 application together with compost and fertilizer mixture were found effective. Therefore, the results of this study imply that application of competent PSB isolates together with nutrient supplements improved symbiotic effectiveness, sustainable production, and environmental health. Consequently, these promising isolates would be recommended for tomato production of higher yield and sustainability after verifying their efficacy at different agroecology and taxonomic identification. Screening potential strains and evaluating their competence under different conditions would be the future perspectives to develop efficient inoculants. Moreover, synergetic application of organic supplements (compost, farmyard, bone meal, or other biowastes), bioinoculants, and proper agrochemicals maximize production and environmental health and is feasible for the economic, social, and ecological sense of balance.

Research Article

Evaluation of the Crossbreeding Scheme and Farmers’ Perception of Awassi and Dorper Crossbred Sheep

The objectives of this study were to characterize the performance of crossbred sheep and crossbreeding scheme and to solicit farmers’ opinions about crossbred sheep. A total of 238 respondents were selected from five districts and data were collected through a personal interview, focus group discussion, measurement of animals, and field observation. Continuous type of data were analyzed using different procedures of SAS, while the estimated breeding value (EBV) for distributed rams was estimated by the WOMBAT software fitting animal model. The findings showed that sheep were the most significant species and that they were primarily raised for meat consumption and income generation. The proportions of crossbred sheep were 79.6% in Angot, 61.3% in Dessie zuria, 64.2% in Gazo, 80.6% in Legambo, and 27.5% in the Kobo area. The sheep crossbreeding program was constrained by feed shortage, lack of improved genotype, and diseases. The ongoing sheep crossbreeding program lacks a proper recording scheme, rams were not selected based on genetic merit, not exchanged in time, lack periodic importation of genetically unrelated rams, and lacks fixing the maximum exotic gene level suitable for the production system. The EBVs of Dorper crossbred rams for birth weight and weaning weight were 0.007 kg and 0.273 kg, respectively. Tikur sheep had an earlier age at first lambing (AFL) than Awassi x Tikur sheep. Likewise, the indigenous Wollo sheep had earlier AFL, short lambing interval, and produced a large number of lambs per lifetime than their Awassi crossbreds. Dorper crossbreds were preferred (9.30 - 72.2 times greater and ) for their growth rate, physical appearance, preference in the market or price, and milk production of ewes compared with indigenous Tumele sheep. The Awassi crossbred sheep were preferred (odds ratio = 12.7– 90.0 and ) due to their good physical appearance, fast growth rate, wool yield, milk yield, and better preference in the market compared with Tikur and Wollo sheep breeds. The implementation of the crossbreeding program needs some sort of revision, monitoring, and periodic evaluation. Besides, it must be accompanied by improved management to exploit the expected benefits from the crossbreeding program in the low-input production system.

Research Article

A Preliminary Evaluation of Variability, Genetic Estimates, and Association among Phenotypic Traits of African Yam Bean Landraces from Ghana

A field experiment was conducted at the Research and Teaching Farm, School of Agriculture and Technology (SOAT), University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR), Dormaa Ahenkro Campus, Ghana, to determine the genetic variability, heritability, genetic advance, and correlation among growth and yield traits of the African yam bean in Ghana. There were significant differences () for the traits studied, except for days to 50% emergence, petiole length, days to maturity, stem diameter, days to 50% flowering, pod weight, pod beak length, pod weight per plant, seed length, and seed width. The phenotypic coefficient of variation and genotypic coefficient of variation for the yield and yield components ranged from 9.43% to 18.92% and 3.25% to 15.93%, respectively, and from 9.35% to 20.08% and 2.15% to 23.28%, respectively, for the growth parameters. Heritability ranged from 34.54% to 91.81, and the GAM ranged from 2.77% to 45.96% for the growth parameters. The heritability and GAM for the yield parameters ranged from 11.85% to 73.56% and 1.94% to 27.64%, respectively. The correlation analysis revealed a positive and highly significant () relationship between petiole length and leaf length (r = 0.573), number of seeds per pod and number of leaves (r = 0.520), pod beak length and peduncle length (r = 0.560), pod weight per plant and pod weight per plot (r = 0.971), seed weight per plant and 100 seed weight (r = 0.967), grain yield and 100 seed weight (r = 0.999) and seed weight per plant (r = 0.970), 100 seed weight and pod per plant (r = 0.576). The study revealed diversity among the AYB landraces collected, which provides an opportunity for improvement of the African yam bean in Ghana. There is the need for the conservation of these landraces for further evaluations and the improvement of the promising landraces and traits through breeding programmes.

Advances in Agriculture
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate13%
Submission to final decision92 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore1.600
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.