International Journal of Agronomy
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Acceptance rate13%
Submission to final decision111 days
Acceptance to publication23 days
CiteScore2.500
Journal Citation Indicator0.430
Impact Factor-

Yield Response of Hybrid and Open Pollinated Maize (Zea mays L.) Varieties to Different Levels of Fertilizer Nitrogen under Rain-Fed Conditions in the Bono Region of Ghana

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International Journal of Agronomy publishes research focused on crop production and management, crop science and physiology, crop disease and protection, and agroclimatology and soil science.

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Chief Editor, Dr. Othmane Merah, is an Associate Professor at the University of Toulouse Paul Sabatier, France.

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Research Article

Vermicompost and NPSZnB Fertilizer Levels on Maize (Zea mays L.) Growth, Yield Component, and Yield at Guto Gida, Western Ethiopia

The application of organic and inorganic fertilizers together increases crop productivity and soil fertility. However, it is crucial to identify the combined application level. A field experiment was carried out in the Guto Gida district in 2021 to determine the effect of vermicompost levels and chemically mixed NPSZnB fertilizer rates on the growth and yield of maize. Four vermicompost levels (0, 2.5, 5, and 7.5 t·ha−1) combined with four artificial NPSZnB fertilizer rates (0, 50, 100, and 150 kg·ha−1) were used for the study in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with 3 replicates. Crop phenology and biomass yield were both significantly influenced by the main effects of vermicompost level and NPSZnB rate. Vermicompost and NPSZnB fertilizer applied together had a large effect on plant height, leaf area index, ear weight, thousand kernel weight, and grain yield. The largest grain yield (8.03 t·ha−1) was produced by the interaction of vermicompost at 7.5 t·ha−1 with 150 kg·ha−1 NPSZnB, followed by all levels of vermicompost at and above 5 t·ha−1 with 100 and 150 kg·ha−1 NPSZnB. Additionally, plots treated with a combined application of vermicompost and NPSZnB fertilizer at rates of 5 t·ha−1 × 100 kg·ha−1 and 5 t·ha−1 × 150 kg·ha−1, respectively, recorded the greatest values of ear weight (276.1 g) and thousand kernel weight (49.79 g). However, the lower yield was obtained from plots that were untreated with both vermicompost and NPSZnB, and the plot treated only with 50–150 kg·ha−1 of NPSZnB. In conclusion, integrated applications of vermicompost at 5 t·ha−1 and NPSZnB fertilizer at 100 kg·ha−1 increased maize yield by about 10.36%, with a net benefit of 140486.00 ETB·ha−1 and a marginal rate of return of 797.98%. As a result, vermicompost application at 5 t·ha−1 rate with synthetic NPSZnB fertilizer at 100 kg·ha−1 is found suitable for the study area.

Research Article

Grain Yield and Yield Related Traits of Bread Wheat as Influenced by N and Seeding Rates and Their Interaction Effects in 2020 under Irrigation at Western and North of Oromia, Ethiopia

Wheat is among the cultivated and important crops in Ethiopia because of its high value as a stable food that is mostly grown under rain-fed conditions. Even though the country has the potential to produce a sufficient amount of wheat grain under rain-fed and by using irrigation, the country still depends on importing wheat grain every year. Soil fertility depletion, inappropriate agronomic practices, erratic rainfall, and drought are among the constraints to the low yield of wheat crops in the country. In view of this, the field experiment was conducted during the off-season of 2020 in five districts, namely, Horo, Jimma Geneti, Jimma Arjo, Wayu Tuka, and Degem districts that are selected as representatives in terms of agricultural production and irrigation potential. The treatments consisted of five N fertilizer levels (0, 23, 46, 69, and 92 kg·ha−1) and three seeding rates (125, 150, and 175 kg·ha−1) of bread wheat, which constituted a total of 15 treatments. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with a factorial arrangement in three replications. The plot size was 3 m × 5 m. From the study, we observed that the grain yield and yield components of wheat were improved by optimizing nitrogen application and plant population. Maximum grain yield of 6.8, 8.9, 4.1, 4.8, and 2.5 t·ha−1 was recorded in response to the use of 92/125, 23/150, 23/150 and 175, 69/150, and 69/175 kg·ha−1 N/seed rate of wheat under irrigation condition in Horo, Jimma Geneti, Jimma Arjo, Wayu Tuka, and Degem districts, respectively. On the contrary, the lowest yield was observed from the unfertilized plot that was planted at 125 kg·ha−1 seed rate in all districts, except in Jimma Geneti, which was observed at 0/150 kg·ha−1 N/seed rate. The differences in yield between districts are mainly attributed to the variability in their soil-plant nutrient contents. Thus, N fertilizer and seed rates at 23/150, 69/150, 46/50, and 92/125 kg·ha−1 in Jimma Arjo and Jimma Geneti, Wayu Tuka, Degem, and Horo districts, respectively, gave maximum yield and net benefit with acceptable marginal rate of return, and it is economically feasible and the best rate to use by the end-users in bread wheat production under irrigation condition in the study area and agro-ecologies that are similar to the study area.

Research Article

Identification of Yield-Limiting Nutrients for Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) Yield, Nutrient Uptake and Use Efficiency on Vertisols of Raya Kobo District, Northeastern Ethiopia

Agricultural productivity was negatively impacted by low soil fertility and uneven fertilizer application during crop cultivation in Ethiopia. Because of this, important crops frequently respond to fertilizer applications significantly below their achievable and potential yields. This study was carried out to determine the most sorghum yield-limiting nutrients in the Raya Kobo area of the Amhara Region in the 2020/21 crop season. Sorghum variety Girana-One was used as the test crop. Control, NPS, PSBZn, NPBZn, NSBZn, NPSB, NPSZn, NPSBZn, recommended NP, and NPSKBZn were treatments. Three replications of the experiment were used in a randomized complete block design. Before treatment application, a composite soil sample was collected at a depth of 0–20 cm to determine the soil’s physicochemical properties. To evaluate N and P uptakes, samples of sorghum stalk and grain were collected. SAS software was used to analyze the data. Results showed that, NPKSZnB produced a considerably greater grain yield (4620 kg·ha−1), whereas the control and N omitted plots produced the lowest grain yields (2759 kg·ha−1) and 2805 kg·ha−1, respectively. Nitrogen fertilizer missing plots showed a statistically significant yield drop compared to the other plots, and there was no statistically significant yield difference between the prescribed NP plots and the potassium, sulfur, boron, or zinc omitted plots. The plots treated with NPKSZnB had the highest agronomic efficiency for N (19.7 kg grain kg−1·N) and P (10.6 kg grain kg−1 P2O5). Therefore, research and development should therefore concentrate on nitrogen to achieve the best sorghum yield for the study location. Phosphorus might also be used to keep the fertility level within the ideal range.

Research Article

Rice Yield Improvement by Sugarcane Filter Cake Fertilizer Application in the Protected Dyke

This study was carried out to evaluate the fertility of rice soil and the effect of inorganic fertilizers combined with sugarcane filter cakes on rice yield in a protected dike area in Cho Moi district, An Giang province. The experiment consists of 4 treatments, and the dose of fertilizer in each treatment is (1) controlled according to the farmers’ dosage (224 kg N + 148 kg P2O5 ha−1), (2) fertilize according to farmers + 6 tons/ha of cow manure composted with straw, (3) fertilizer according to farmers + 6 tons/ha of cow manure composted 15 cm deep, and (4) fertilize according to farmers + 2 tons/ha of organic fertilizer with sugarcane filter cakes. By analyzing the nutrient content of soil samples, it was found that inorganic fertilizers in combination with sugarcane residues improved soil fertility as reduced soil acidity and electrical conductivity, and increased organic matter, total nitrogen content, and exchangeable K. In addition, exchange and enriched exchangeable Mg achieved the highest rice yield, a statistically significant difference compared with organic fertilizer treatment with straw compost and inorganic fertilizer. However, the content of total P, available P, exchangeable Na, and Ca have not improved significantly. Therefore, applying inorganic fertilizers combined with sugarcane filter cakes is an excellent measure to help improve the supply of nutrients from the soil and increase rice yield in the dike land.

Research Article

Coffee Berry Borer Infestation and Population per Fruit Relationship with Coffee Variety, Shade Level, and Altitude on Specialty Coffee Farms in Peru

Although the coffee berry borer (CBB) is the most important coffee pest worldwide, controversies remain regarding basic aspects of its behavior, such as how this is influenced by abiotic factors of the coffee agroecosystem. In this study, we compared the level of infestation and total population per fruit under three different levels of shade (full sun, up to 40%, and >40%), for two varieties of coffee (Caturra and Catimor) and at two different altitudes (1200 to 1700 m above sea level) in Rodríguez de Mendoza, Peru. We found that the infestation percentage increases with the shade levels of the plot. The average percentages of infestation according to shade levels were 10.52% for coffee in full sun, 12.56% with up to 40% shade, and 17.99% for coffee growing in more than 40% shade; however, maximum infestation values of 68.421%, 84.127%, and 95.238% were obtained for coffee plantations in full sun, up to 40% shade, and more than 40% shade, respectively. The Catimor variety was found to be more susceptible to CBB infestation than Caturra. In addition, CBB infestation per fruit was found to decrease with increasing altitude.

Research Article

Hybrid Vigor and Heritability Estimates in Tomato Crosses Involving Solanum lycopersicum × S. pimpinellifolium under Cool Tropical Monsoon Climate

High humidity is a major constraint to increased tomato fruit production in a cool tropical monsoon climate. However, the genetic variation observed in Solanum pimpinellifolium makes it a good gene donor for breeding tomato cultivars capable of thriving under high humidity. The objective of this study was to estimate heterosis, heritability for higher yield, and to assess the adaptability of the genotypes to humid conditions. Genotypes were raised from five morphologically divergent parents, viz., wild parent (W)–“LA2093,” “CLN2498D” (D), “CLN2417H” (H), “Tima” (T), and “UC Dan INDIA” (U). The F1s were generated by biparental mating design using “LA2093” as a common pollen donor that was selfed to produce F2s and backcrossed to both parents to obtain BC1s and BC2s. The trial was laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replicates. Data were collected on selected yield-influencing traits and analyzed. “D × W” and “U × W” hybrids showed significant positive better parent heterosis for fruit weight per plant (30.4% and 35.5%) and total fruit yield (48.6% and 26.9%), respectively. The additive variance was higher than dominance variance for all the traits, including total fruit yield in all hybrids viz., “H × W,” “D × W,” “T × W,” and “U × W.” High narrow sense heritability estimate of ≥60% was observed in “D × W” and “U × W” hybrids for the majority of the floral and fruit traits including total fruit yield. This makes the improvement of “D × W” and “U × W” hybrids by direct selection advantageous. Hence, the adoption of selection for the affected traits in subsequent tomato breeding programs would enhance fruit yield and adaptability to humid environments.

International Journal of Agronomy
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate13%
Submission to final decision111 days
Acceptance to publication23 days
CiteScore2.500
Journal Citation Indicator0.430
Impact Factor-
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